Intel on AI Privacy and Security

Intel today published a new report on artificial intelligence and public policy that includes specific recommendations on privacy and security: “Where the data used for AI originates from identifiable individuals, appropriate protections should be implemented to ensure that data is deidentified, lawfully accessed, processed, and kept safe. Robust privacy regulatory frameworks for the protection of personal data and cybersecurity should also apply to AI implementations.”

Intel and Artificial Intelligence

Intel powers the cloud and billions of smart, connected computing devices. Due to the decreasing cost of computing enabled by Moore’s Law1 and the increasing availability of connectivity, these connected devices are now generating millions of terabytes of data every day. Recent breakthroughs in computer and data science give us the ability to timely analyze and derive immense value from that data. As Intel distributes the computing capability of the data center across the entire global network, the impact of artificial intelligence is significantly increasing. Artificial intelligence is creating an opportunity to drive a new wave of economic progress while solving some of the world’s most difficult problems. This is the artificial intelligence (AI) opportunity. To allow AI to realize its potential, governments need to create a public policy environment that fosters AI innovation, while also mitigating unintended societal consequences. This document presents Intel’s AI public policy recommendations.

By |2017-10-18T10:41:50+00:00October 18th, 2017|0 Comments

About the Author:

Brian Ray
Professor Brian Ray has extensive experience in eDiscovery, information governance and data privacy. He and Candice Hoke created and serve as Co-Directors of the Center for Cybersecurity and Data Privacy at Cleveland-Marshall College of Law, where they are Professors of Law. Brian co-founded, with Tim Opsitnick of Jurinnov, the Cleveland eDiscovery Roundtable, an informal group of lawyers, judges and academics that meets monthly to discuss issues surrounding electronic discovery, cybersecurity and data privacy issues. Professor Ray is a member of the Sedona Conference's International Electronic Information Management, Discovery and Disclosure and Data Security and Privacy Liability Working Groups. Professor Ray also is an expert in international and comparative law. His book, Engaging with Social Rights: Participation, Procedure and Democracy in South Africa's Second-Wave (forthcoming Cambridge 2016) provides a comprehensive analysis of the South African Constitutional Court's social rights decisions. He has served as a Fulbright Scholar in South Africa and has published extensively on the law of human rights.

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